This Week’s Knauss Seminars!

The Knauss Lecture Series features current 2013 Sea Grant Knauss fellows. Talks are held the third Thursday of every month.

For remote access via webinar please fill out the registration form a few minutes before the meeting is scheduled to begin. The Meeting Number is 742656968; the Passcode is brownbag. For audio in the US and Canada, dial 866-833-7307. The participant passcode is 8986360.

August’s talks will be held from 12-1pm EDT, August 15 in the NOAA Central Library, SSMC3 featuring:

Theresa Davenport, NOAA Policy, Planning, and Evaluation
From Shoreline Seining to Student Training: Shoreline development effects on near-shore communities in Chesapeake Bay

VA_Theresa_Davenport

Hardened shorelines and their construction introduce stressors by altering near-shore habitats.  I investigated the impacts of shoreline development on near-shore communities at four sub-estuaries within Chesapeake Bay with a before-after control-impact (BACI) study design.  The benthic community responded in complex ways, often driven by opportunistic species.  Additionally, habitat changes that resulted from shoreline development reflected changes in the benthic community.  I concurrently shared this work with local high school students, introduced them to coastal ecology, and monitored their perception of science, before and after our interactions.

Carrie Soltanoff, NOAA Fisheries Office of International Affairs
Shifting environmental baselines among small-scale fishers in the Galera-San Francisco Marine Reserve, Ecuador

MD_Carrie_Soltanoff

Shifting environmental baselines refers to the concept that each generation of fishers, and fishery managers, see the current state of the fishery as the natural, or baseline, abundance. To investigate this phenomenon adjacent to a recently established marine reserve, 92 fishers from three generations were interviewed. Differences in fishing practices and perceptions of the fishery among generations were revealed, including that older fishers stayed closer to shore and found the fishery to be depleted. Shifting baselines can impede reserve success because younger fishers may believe that an area remains underfished and therefore not see value in restrictive conservation measures. Given data-poor fisheries, baselines and targets set from present-day numbers may be too low to realize conservation goals, particularly if ecological knowledge from older generations reveals that fisheries are depleted. The presence of shifting baselines underscores the importance of incorporating local knowledge into management and education measures for a marine reserve.

For remote access via webinar please fill out the registration form a few minutes before the meeting is scheduled to begin. The Meeting Number is 742656968; the Passcode is brownbag. For audio in the US and Canada, dial 866-833-7307. The participant passcode is 8986360.

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